Vol. 7, No. 2 • March/April 2000
• THE REFERENCE SHELF •
Authoritative Guide to Evaluating Information on the Internet

by Jean Reese


THE REFERENCE SHELF column presents a mixed review of "Authoritative Guide to Evaluating Information on the Internet" ($55) by Alison Cooke, published by Neal-Schuman Publishers of New York, NY. Says that this 169-page softcover book provides an overview of the problems that have come about due to the large amount of information now available on the Internet, covers search facilities, includes checklists for the various components used in evaluating specific Web sites, and takes an in-depth look at types of Web pages. Notes that the examples of the various tools often do not include the latest examples. Recommends it for someone who is really serious about learning to evaluate Web information, especially if details and specifics are needed. However, concludes that, for most people, the price may be prohibitive, given other resources available.
Great Scouts! CyberGuides for Subject Searching on the Web
by Jean Reese


THE REFERENCE SHELF column presents a favorable review of "Great Scouts! CyberGuides for Subject Searching on the Web" ($24.95) by Nora Paul and Margot Williams, published in 1999 by CyberAge Books of Medford, NJ. Says that this softcover book is an evaluative guide to selective Web sites and helps people find subject-specific information. Relates that the very specific criteria used in selecting the sites includes many of the same things most people would use plus more, such as "metainformation," searchability of listings, and listing charge. Notes that the book is divided into four parts: "Life and Times," "Business and Professional Resources," "Arts and Entertainment," and "Science and Technology." States that this book will provide excellent sources for busy teachers who want high-quality Web sites in a variety of subject areas.
How Teachers Learn Technology Best
by Jean Reese


THE REFERENCE SHELF column presents a very favorable review of "How Teachers Learn Technology Best" ($20) by Jamie McKenzie, published in 1999 by FNO Press of Bellingham, WA. Says that most of the articles in this softcover book were previously published in various journals and publications, and the intent is to provide discussion about the approach to adult learning of the new technologies. States that the book is divided into two parts: "Why Network," which explores chapters that deal with the reasons teachers will embrace technology in their classrooms as well as concrete examples of digital learning and strategic teaching; and "Designing Adult Learning," which promotes a concept that will reach a broad range of educators rather than just the early adoptive teachers. Provides a plan of action for schools to get the most out of their technology investments.
Using Internet Primary Resources to Teach Critical Thinking Skills in History
by Jean Reese


THE REFERENCE SHELF column presents a favorable review of "Using Internet Primary Resources to Teach Critical Thinking Skills in History" ($39.95) by Kathleen W. Craver, published in 1999 by Greenwood Press of Westport, CT. Says that the goal of this 280-page hardcover book is to provide history teachers with a source for using the Internet as a tool for primary resources to teach critical-thinking skills. Adds that it promotes school library media centers as critical resources for secondary resources and as the focal point for integrating both print and electronic tools. Says that the third part of the book is where teachers can find a wonderful array of lesson plans for a range of history subjects, from ancient civilization up through the 20th century. Recommends it for any history teacher too busy to mine the Internet to create a history curriculum.
The Web Page Workbook
by Jean Reese


THE REFERENCE SHELF column presents a favorable review of "The Web Page Workbook, 2nd Edition" ($29.95) by Dawn Groves, John Finnegan, and Jeffrey Griffin, published in 1999 by Franklin, Beedle & Associates of Wilsonville, OR. Says that the second edition of this 200-page softcover book builds largely on the first, with much of the same information in this newer book. Relates that it is written as a textbook, with lessons intended to fill six hours of class time. However, adds that an individual can also use it to learn the basics of creating simple Web pages easily and in a straightforward manner. States that it consists of step-by-step tutorials with lots of examples and exercises that build upon each other, and includes a glossary as well as an index. Recommends trying this workbook to learn some basic hypertext markup language (HTML) programming and to have some fun at the same time.
Internet & Personal Computing Abstracts  © 2000 Information Today, Inc.