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Magazines > Information Today > April 2014

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Information Today
Vol. 31 No. 3 — April 2014
EDITOR'S NOTE
Here's the Latest
by Deborah Poulson


This issue’s feature articles may bring to mind fairy tales, what with their global visions, significant dates, and mythological creatures. In reality, however, what you’ll find is a discussion between ProQuest CEO Kurt Sanford and ITI VP of content Dick Kaser about the direction the info company is headed, a report on the Digital Public Library of America as it turns 1, and a look at the dreaded copyright troll.

But that’s not all. For news on recent events in the industry, take a look at Ray Lewis’ article on VALA 2014, which took place in Melbourne, Australia. The “hot” (it’s summer there) topics Down Under are cloud computing, Big Data, ebooks, and MOOCs. You’ll also learn about keynote speaker Joe Murphy’s thoughts on “Library as Future.”

Are you familiar with BuzzFeed’s humorous videos and listicles? If not, Mick O’Leary offers an introduction to the website in Database Review. The site is more than just cat videos, though—it covers serious news stories as well.

Copyright infringement lawsuits have statutes of limitations. Currently those suits need to be made within 3 years of the claimed infringement. But what happens if a copyright infringement claim isn’t made for 18 years? George Pike goes into the nitty-gritty details of Petrella v. Metro-Goldwyn-Meyer, Inc., to determine who has the rights to the De Niro/Scorsese film Raging Bull.

And as always, we have more updates about happenings in the industry and news on product releases. Just turn the page.

— Deborah Poulson


Deborah Poulson is Editor of Information Today. Send your comments about this article to itletters@infotoday.com.
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