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Conferences > Computers in Libraries 2006
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The Technology Conference for Information Age Librarians
Computers in Libraries 2006 March 22-24, 2006
Hilton Washington
1919 Connecticut Ave. NW Washington, DC
Managing Digital: Innovations, Initiatives & Insights
Conference Overview Conference At-a-Glance [PDF] NEW!Presentation Links
Final Program NEW!Attendee Survey NEW!Exhibitor Survey
Exhibitor List Internet@Schools East 2006 Previous CIL Conferences
InfoTodayBlog.com coverage Conference CD-ROM The Unofficial CIL 2006 Wiki
 




General Conference — Thursday, March 23
Track A Track B Track C Track D

International Ballroom Center
Keynote — Planning for a Handheld Mobile Future
9:00 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.

Megan Fox, Web & Electronic Resources Librarian, Simmons College

As more and more of our clients and staff members interact with the library using mobile handheld devices, such as PDAs, iPods and smart phones, it is increasingly important to understand both the possibilities and the limits of providing content and services for small screen mobile devices. Fox provides an overview of the current hardware available, and how new technologies are making handheld computers not just palatable but preferable for on-the-go users. She highlights both what clients are already doing on these tools—from text/instant messaging to local search for nearby restaurants and directions—as well as what libraries could be doing with mobile search (of the Web, the library catalog, or subscription databases); RSS news and other alerts (such as books coming due); podcasting and audio content.

International Ballroom Center
Track A – Content Management
Content management is a hot area not only for libraries but for just about every organization. Hear about new strategies and techniques from our experts and practitioners.
Moderated by John Latham, Special Libraries Association

Coffee Break — A Chance to Visit the Exhibits
9:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

Session A201 — Exploiting the Value of Structured Metadata
10:30 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.

Lorcan Dempsey, OCLC

Libraries make major investments in creating, maintaining, and sharing standardized data (e.g., metadata) but frequently fail to realize the full value of the data they possess. Technorati, Wikpedia, and a host of other voluntary-contribution platforms offer proof that end users are eager and willing to build and enhance the information commons. This session looks at creative
initiatives underway and suggests strategies for the future.

Session A202 — Digital Project Development
11:30 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Craig Summerhill, University of Nevada, Reno

The University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) has been developing digital collections with CONTENTdm since 2002. Its extensive collections include primary source materials from Special Collections, the Department of Art in the College of Liberal Arts, the Center for Basque Studies, and the Office of the Vice President for Marketing and Communications. Image libraries, maps, artworks, and documents are now accessible online in regional collaborations such as the Mountain West Digital Library and OAIster digital information retrieval resource based at the University of Michigan. Craig describes implementation, community response, lessons learned, and future plans.

Lunch Break — A Chance to Visit the Exhibits
12:15 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.

Session A203 — Collaborative Digital Projects: The ECHO Depository
1:45 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Taylor Surface, OCLC
Richard Pearce-Moses, Director of Digital Government Information, Arizona State Library & Archives
Thomas Habing, Grainger Engineering Library


The ECHO Depository project aims to address the issues of how to collect, manage, preserve, and make useful the enormous amount of digital information our culture is now producing. It is a partnership between the University of Illinois; OCLC; Tufts University’s Perseus Project; the Michigan State University Library; and an alliance of state libraries from Arizona, Connecticut, Illinois, North Carolina, and Wisconsin. It has adapted archival criteria for selecting Web publications for capture and preservation based on the “Arizona Model” and OCLC has built software to automate the process. It is conducting a comparative repository architecture evaluation, and examining issues related to the semantic preservation of the digital content we harvest and retain. This session provides an overview of project results to date and outlines the implications for the future of preservation of born-digital information objects.

Coffee Break — A Chance to Visit the Exhibits
2:30 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.

Meet the Author!
RACHEL SINGER GORDON
Author of The NextGen Librarian’s Survival Guide

Visit the Information Today, Inc. booth, where Rachel will be signing copies of her new book—available for the first time anywhere at Computers in Libraries!
Sessions A204 & A205 — Taxonomy Tales
3:15 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.


Jennifer Evert, Taxonomy Product Manager, Lexis Nexis
Marjorie M. K. Hlava, Access Innovations Inc.


While information professionals remain experts in the development and management of controlled vocabularies, end users are benefiting more and more from the application and use of valuable metadata. Evert discusses easy Web interfaces for exploiting indexing and taxonomies at many points in the research process and illustrates with case studies. Hlava discusses integrating search and display to highlight relevance as well as to underscore that placement of data is not straight-forward to achieve. She illustrates with a case study of Media Sleuth's portal which uses a taxonomy to display all records tagged with an individual taxonomy term as well as to expand searching using all taxonomic equivalents.

International Ballroom West
Track B – Digital Libraries
This track includes practical tips from those who have been there and done that as well as the long view on digital preservation.

Moderated by Hope Tillman, Babson College

Coffee Break — A Chance to Visit the Exhibits
9:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

Session B201 — Digitizing & Creating New Collections
10:30 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.

Sharon Carlson, Director, Archives and Regional History Collections, Western Michigan University (WMU)
Margaret Graham, Digital Projects Archivist, & Charles Dennis, Digital Development Archivist, Drexel University College of Medicine, Archives & Special Collections on Women in Medicine


Digitization provides opportunities to take existing archival collections and create new collections. A Civil War diary digitization project at WMU drew from eight existing archival collections to create a new collection of digitized diaries with searchable transcribed text. Hear how they addressed basic archival theory, ordered the digital collections, approached traditional and online finding aids for collections that previously had no relationship to one another, and more. Graham talks about building an open source digital library from the ground up, creating a digital collection of 25,000 pages of historic graphic and textual materials on the history of women physicians. Learn from our speakers’ experience as they share lessons learned, strategies, tips and techniques.

Session B202 — Digitization Issues & Challenges
11:30 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Stephen Abram, VP Innovation, SirsiDynix
Lloyd Davidson, Northwestern University
Christopher Warnock, ebrary


Digitization and dealing with digital and nondigital content is at the core of our challenges today. This panel provides different perspectives, strategies, ideas and insights. Join us for a lively discussion.

Lunch Break — A Chance to Visit the Exhibits
12:15 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.

Session B203 — Long-Term Management of Digital Collections
1:45 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

James Hodson, Digital Conversion Specialist, Library of Congress


The successful long-term preservation of digital materials will only come as a result of the confluence of various forces. Efforts towards long-term management of digital collections must include not only technical and systemic issues, but also educational, cultural, and societal commitments. This session provides an overview of the necessary components and assesses what has been achieved so far and what remains to be achieved.

Coffee Break — A Chance to Visit the Exhibits
2:30 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.

Meet the Author!
RACHEL SINGER GORDON
Author of The NextGen Librarian’s Survival Guide

Visit the Information Today, Inc. booth, where Rachel will be signing copies of her new book—available for the first time anywhere at Computers in Libraries!
Session B204 — Digital Preservation & the Open Web
3:15 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.


Joanne Kaczmarek, Archivist for Electronic Records, University of Illinois Urbana–Champaign
Terence K. Huwe, Director of Library & Information Resources, Institute of Industrial Relations, University of California, Berkeley


Hear findings from two organizations involved in the Library of Congress National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Project (NDIIPP) initiative. Kaczmarek focuses on issues related to digital preservation, rights management, and intellectual property rights, while Huwe addresses Web archiving and collection development challenges as well as developing toolkits to assist with these activities.
Session B205 — The Michigan eLibrary (MeL): Growing Pains and Gains
4:15 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Sheryl Mase, Director, Library Development & Data Services, Library of Michigan

The Library of Michigan (LM) and the Michigan Library Consortium (MLC) unveiled the new look and features of the Michigan eLibrary (MeL) featuring a federated searching gateway to MeL Internet, MeL Databases, MeL Digital, and MeLCat, the new statewide resource-sharing system. Libraries of all sizes and types have been involved in vendor selection, policy formulation, and system development. Every library in the state will be eligible to participate in the union catalog, without the need to change their local automated system, making this one of the few truly multitype statewide resource-sharing efforts in the country. Hear about this ambitious project, with the potential for participation from more than 1,000 Michigan libraries, the challenges of working with multiple vendors of multiple library systems on a large scale, dealing with user desire for simplicity with the complexities of providing federated searching, and developing policies that meet the needs for every size library--from large research libraries to small public and K–12 libraries.

International Ballroom East
Track C – Learning
There’s no turning back—the Web has consumed us! Much, if not most, of our library world revolves around it, or has been heavily influenced by it. That goes double for teaching, training, and instruction. Not only are patrons and students increasingly sophisticated at using the Web, more and more they expect to learn on it. This requires the knowledge and skills to create online learning, the technological applications to facilitate it, an understanding of the issues and consequences of doing it, and help! This track presents several sides of Web-enabled learning. From training to instruction, it provides in-depth insight and ways to plan, build and use it online.

Organized and moderated by D. Scott Brandt, Purdue University Libraries

Coffee Break — A Chance to Visit the Exhibits
9:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

Sessions C201 — Two Views on Educating Librarians
10:30 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.

Jeanne Holba Puacz, Adjunct Faculty, University of Illinois
Lynn Westbrook, Assistant Professor, University of Texas


First, while various technologies have become ubiquitous in libraries, technology-related issues and questions raised by patrons are increasing in number and sophistication. A survey of options is shared for training librarians in their pursuit of greater technological knowledge. Second, developments in adult education, digital communication, and human-computer interaction have moved digital reference training from “first generation” into a “second generation.” Four overarching guidelines and essential training principles for various stages of the reference interview are discussed in this new context.

Session C202 — Training for Staff & Patrons in Public Libraries
11:30 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Janie Hassard Hermann, Technology Instruction Librarian, Princeton Public Library
Travis Bussler, Network Administrator, Chippewa River District Library

To take technology training to the next level and devise innovative programs and classes requires increasingly tech-savvy trainers. This session examines solutions, offers an overview of trends in training, and looks at “what’s hot and what’s not.” It also revisits the issue of “basic” training in a public library setting. How much training, and what kind, is needed to get staff to
the level of being able to trouble shoot problems when there isn’t a systems department?
Lunch Break — A Chance to Visit the Exhibits
12:15 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.

Session C203 — Plagiarism: Confrontation or Collaboration?
1:45 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Susan Herzog, Information Literacy Librarian, Kimberly Armstrong Silcox, University Judicial Officer, & Janice Wilson, Reference and Instruction Librarian, Eastern Connecticut State University


The 21st-century electronic environment has made it very easy for students to succumb to plagiarism and more difficult than ever for faculty to prevent and detect it. This presentation describes two successful programs, organized by the Information Literacy Librarian, that can easily be duplicated on your campus. It aims to empower librarians to be recognized as essential partners in learning and scholarship with faculty and other colleagues.

Coffee Break — A Chance to Visit the Exhibits
2:30 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.

Meet the Author!
RACHEL SINGER GORDON
Author of The NextGen Librarian’s Survival Guide

Visit the Information Today, Inc. booth, where Rachel will be signing copies of her new book—available for the first time anywhere at Computers in Libraries!
Session C204 — Information Literacy & Instruction
3:15 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.


Kathleen Stacey, Instruction Librarian, Montgomery College
Chad Boeninger, Reference & Instruction Librarian, Ohio University


Many academic librarians are still challenged by the overwhelming amount of information that can be presented in a typical “one-shot” library instruction session. This session begins by reviewing what basic elements of instruction can be covered in 1 hour. Then, looking at new ways to achieve information literacy goals, the second presentation explores the use of a wiki as a research guide. Lessons learned in this process of experimenting with a wiki as a subject guide include pros and cons of community editing, getting others to contribute, and the strengths and weaknesses of the wiki over traditional HTML research guides.
Session C205 — Online Teaching Skills
4:15 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Melissa Harvey, Computer Science Librarian, Carnegie Mellon University

Distance learning has opened many new doors for librarians to teach online. While they may be great teachers in the classroom or at a reference desk, teaching online is a whole different world. This presentation covers techniques to use for tutorials, library instruction, or for entire courses taught online. Learn skills to become an effective and successful online teacher.

Jefferson Room
Track D – Planning In & For a Digital World
Since we have no idea what the future will bring, we need as much information and as many processes as we can get to make reasonable plans. This track is filled with tips, strategies, processes, and ideas for building solid plans for our ever-changing digital future.

Moderated by Donna Scheeder, Law Library of Congress

Coffee Break — A Chance to Visit the Exhibits
9:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

Session D201 — Scanning for Planning
10:30 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.

Alane Wilson, OCLC, & Editor, 2003 OCLC Environmental Scan

If you don’t know what’s going on around you, how can you plan? This session provides a key for planning tools and process. It defines environmental scanning (ES), discusses its importance for planning in any organization, comments on the lack of information on ES in the library literature, and provides practical tips and advice for creating your own ES. Wilson illustrates the process used by OCLC for its scan, includes strategies for how to be successful in doing your own scan, and great resources for information on ES.

Session D202 — Digital Preservation: Planning for the Future
11:30 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Donna Scheeder, Director, Law Library of Congress
Judith C. Russell, Superintendent of Documents & Managing Director, Information Dissemination, U.S. Government Printing Office
Michael Kurtz, Assistant Archivist, National Archives & Records Administration


Librarians, archivists, and records managers share the challenges of digital preservation. While the goal is the same, the Archives, the Government Printing Office, and the Library of Congress are taking different approaches to tackling this issue. The speakers share their different perspectives and report on their progress and future plans. Provides lots of insights for planning your own digital future.

Lunch Break — A Chance to Visit the Exhibits
12:15 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.

Session D203 — New Library, New Technologies, New Services
1:45 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Bill Helling, Crawfordsville District Public Library

How can you move from a century-old Carnegie library to a newly constructed building with three times the floor space—expecting to greatly increase circulation and serve many more patrons—all without adding any library staff or permanently stretching the existing budget? You learn to add to your existing automation level! Helling outlines strategies for a successful implementation of some current technologies while also addressing the serious implications for support staff. Helling covers the library’s adoption of RFID, wireless access, instant messaging, secure Internet computers, and other technologies that allow the automation of time-consuming and staff-intensive procedures.

Coffee Break — A Chance to Visit the Exhibits
2:30 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.

Meet the Author!
RACHEL SINGER GORDON
Author of The NextGen Librarian’s Survival Guide

Visit the Information Today, Inc. booth, where Rachel will be signing copies of her new book—available for the first time anywhere at Computers in Libraries!
Session D204 — Disaster Recovery Planning: What You Need to Know Now
3:15 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.


Frank Cervone, Assistant University Librarian for Information Technology, Northwestern University

Disasters—no one wants to think about them, but we need to have systems and plans in place. Whether it’s a natural disaster or an intruder that has compromised the library’s Web server, being prepared is critical. How should you create a computing disaster plan? What procedures and steps do you need in place before a digital disaster happens? Who is designated to respond when disasters happen? How should your team communicate the plans and keep them up to date? Cervone offers practical and timely advice on planning for computing disasters.
Session D205 — Working & Planning with Your IT Department
4:15 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Barrett Jones, Joint IMF World Bank Library


Many library staffs depend on support from their organization’s IT departments. Some have good relationships and others do not. This session provides tips and insights into how to work with your IT department to build a solid relationship for future planning and implementations. Jones shares his knowledge and experience from years of working with IT departments in a wide variety of corporate and government settings.

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