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Conferences > Computers in Libraries 2006
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The Technology Conference for Information Age Librarians
Computers in Libraries 2006 March 22-24, 2006
Hilton Washington
1919 Connecticut Ave. NW Washington, DC
Managing Digital: Innovations, Initiatives & Insights
Conference Overview Conference At-a-Glance [PDF] NEW!Presentation Links
Final Program NEW!Attendee Survey NEW!Exhibitor Survey
Exhibitor List Internet@Schools East 2006 Previous CIL Conferences
InfoTodayBlog.com coverage Conference CD-ROM The Unofficial CIL 2006 Wiki
 




General Conference — Friday, March 24
Track A Track B Track C Track D

International Ballroom Center
Keynote — The Internet: Enhancing Digital Work & Play
9:00 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.

Lee Rainie, Director, Pew Internet and American Life Project

The Internet makes up the core of our digital world and is responsible for many changes in our behavior. Rainie discusses his project’s current findings about how people use the Internet and looks at the profound impact ubiquitous connectivity is having and will continue to have on the way people interact, participate in groups, and influence their surroundings in the future.

International Ballroom Center
Track A – Search Engines
Search engines (SEs) rule today. Hear the latest tips, thoughts, and speculations about SEs, libraries, and information professionals.
Moderated by Anne Mintz, Forbes, Inc.

Coffee Break — A Chance to Visit the Exhibits
9:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

Session A301 — The Best of Resource Shelf: SE Update
10:30 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.

Gary Price, Director, Online Resources, Ask Jeeves & Publisher, ResourceShelf.com

Our expert shares his top tips and techniques from the search and search engine world to equip you with what you need to deal with our challenging digital world.

Session A302 — SEs and Libraries: The Role of Libraries on the Internet
11:30 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Moderator:  Erik Arnold, Program Manager, Vivisimo, Inc.

Chip Nilges, VP, OCLC New Services Division
Gary Price, Online Resources, Ask Jeeves
Clifford Guren, Director of Publisher Evangelism, MSN Search Content Acquisition

A panel discussion with representatives from OCLC, AskJeeves, MSN and the library community.

Lunch Break — A Chance to Visit the Exhibits
12:15 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.

Session A303 — Measuring the Impact of Google
1:45 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Marshall Breeding, Director, Innovative Technologies and Research, Vanderbilt University Library


The Vanderbilt Television News Archive, existing in the “hidden Web” since 1995 with over 750,000 text-laden records, has been exposed to Web search engines for over a year. The results have monitored how Google and the other search engines have harvested the site and tracked the impact that searching on the open Web has had on the Archive’s primary Web site and in requests for services. Come hear what the results are indicating.

Coffee Break — A Chance to Visit the Exhibits
2:30 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Session A304 — Beyond Search Engines
3:15 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.


DeWitt Clinton, Software Development Engineer, A9.com


This session looks beyond what’s happening today and provides insights about searching in the future.
Session A305 — Is Google the Next Dialog?
4:15 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.


K. Matthew Dames, Founder & Principal, Seso Group LLC, & Publisher, Search & Text Mining Report


Most database providers bill themselves as companies providing terabytes’ worth of data that can be searched with speed and precision. Yet, since its incubation in a Stanford dormitory, Google has revolutionized the way we receive our information. Through its savvy use of P2P-based distributed computing; innovations such as Google Print, Google Scholar, and its Toolbars; its surprisingly efficient (and inexpensive) development platform, Google Labs; and the ability to monetize any type of information stream through its ad programs; Google has effectively moved computing and information retrieval off the desktop and onto the network. And it has done all this while not charging a penny for much of the information to which it provides access. As a result, Google is in the process of changing the way information is transferred while potentially rendering obsolete traditional database companies such as Dialog, Lexis Nexis, and Factiva. How can librarians and info pros thrive in the new Google environment at a time when most of the public believes that Google is making librarians unnecessary?

International Ballroom West
Track B – Digital Systems & Operations
Using new tools, systems, and strategies to survive in a digital information world, our speakers provide practical advice, ideas, and working examples of digital systems and operations.
Moderated by Anne Marie Del Vecchio, LexisNexis

Coffee Break — A Chance to Visit the Exhibits
9:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

Session B301 — Utilities for Safeguarding Your Computing Environment
10:30 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.

Frank Cervone, Assistant University Librarian, Northwestern University

This session discusses and demonstrates free, or inexpensive, products that provide protection against adware, malware, spyware, viruses, etc. Get the latest tips to keep your IT area safe.

Session B302 — Library Wi-Fi 2006
11:30 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Marshall Breeding, Director, Innovative Technologies and Research, Vanderbilt University Library


According to a recent Florida State University study, 18 percent of public libraries have wireless nets already installed, 21 percent will by next year, but over 60 percent have no set plan. No matter which category applies to your library, it’s important to hear the latest word in this fast-moving technology. This session looks at the state of the art in wireless LANs in libraries as the standards continue to evolve and security and authentication remain challenges. Learn the latest alphabet soup of Wi-Fi terms and practices and how to best deploy wireless networks in a library setting.

Lunch Break — A Chance to Visit the Exhibits
12:15 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.

Session B303 — Open Source Software for Libraries
1:45 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Glen Horton, Technology Coordinator, Greater Cincinnati Library Consortium
Rob Withers, Aaron Shrimplin & Rob Casson, Webmasters, Miami University Libraries


Free/open source software has been around for a long time. Even though the open source concept has many of the same principles that libraries promote, much of this software has traditionally lacked the usability and features of its commercial counterparts. Today, many open source projects have “grown up” and now have benefits over commercial software. Horton showcases several projects that libraries can use on their staff/public computers and servers to supplement or replace costly, proprietary software. Withers discusses how his library connected users with resources in a personalized, efficient manner using open source tools and the university’s new portal. Withers and colleagues share their technologies and lessons learned.

Coffee Break — A Chance to Visit the Exhibits
2:30 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Session B304 — Technology Project Management
3:15 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.


Cynthia Hsieh, Head of Technical Services, University Library/ University of the Pacific
Gayane Merguerian, Library Web Manager, & Martin Mehrling, Digital Systems Specialist, Northeastern University Libraries

This session presents two looks at technology project management—learning from mistakes and partnering. Hsieh uses a real-life catastrophic ILS migration project as an example to describe various mistakes to avoid in system selection, planning, profiling, data conversion, training, and implementation. Merguerian builds on the CIL05 presentation of Frank Cervone, Northwestern University, who argued that libraries must play a key role in the development of digital repositories. Many libraries are participating in open source digital repository initiatives, but this approach may not be for everyone due to the considerable staff time and expertise required. Merguerian describes a different path, partnering with a library system vendor, Innovative Interfaces Inc., to develop an integrated digital repository system and demonstrates the benefits and challenges of this approach, sharing the current results of the initiative. Both speakers offer a great look at technology management best, and worst, practices.
Session B305 — Can Your Library Automation Software Do This?
4:15 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

David Hook, Manager, Operations Information and Configuration Management, MDA

MDA’s intranet uses about 30 different Inmagic databases to perform a wide variety of tasks, from managing internal document collections to hosting online auctions. This session shows some creative uses for Inmagic databases, beyond posting your library catalog online, including records management, supplier selection, discussion forums, newsletter generation, and many more. Hear tips for further developing your software.

International Ballroom East
Track C – Digital Reference & Services
This track highlights how libraries and library suppliers are harnessing technology to offer clients never-before-possible services.

Organized and moderated by Rebecca Jones, Dysart & Jones Associates

Coffee Break — A Chance to Visit the Exhibits
9:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

Session C301 — Virtual Teaching Moments: Co-Browsing & Reference
10:30 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.

Clara Hudson, Public Services/Virtual Reference Librarian, University of Scranton Library
Amanda Etches-Johnson, Reference Librarian, McMaster University


Instant messaging (IM) might be useful for quick and dirty reference, but the co-browse screen elevates the virtual environment to an interactive experience. With the implementation of the co-browse interface, the virtual reference experience has moved from Q&A to a teaching/learning environment. As part of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities collaborating to provide 24/7 virtual reference to 23 institutions, Hudson discusses how the tutor.com co-browse interface is used with an IM type chat function, scripts, and file-sharing features to provide next generation virtual reference (VR). Etches-Johnson discusses how McMaster University uses IM as a low-cost, high-tech way to provide service to users already comfortable with the technology. She discusses it’s use as a virtual reference tool.

Session C302 — SMS in Libraries: The Killer AP?
11:30 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

John Iliff, Library Technology Development Consultant, Palinet

Estimates are that well over 1 billion text messages are sent from cell phones each year. As all of that data slings from location to location, in many libraries the extent of discussion about cell phones is to ban their use in quiet study areas. Yes, cell phone use can be annoying, but we are losing site of the picture if we do not jump into connecting with our users, our clients, with a technology that is ubiquitous and easy-to-use. From cabbies to pre-teens to the presenter’s 82-year-old mother, cell phones are the killer technology application. See how Iliff explains some of the potential of short message service (SMS or texting) in the library setting.
Lunch Break — A Chance to Visit the Exhibits
12:15 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.

Session C303 — Delivering Individualized Library Content: Wide Open Portals
1:45 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Tom Ipri, Connelly Library, La Salle University


This session goes beyond his February 2005 Computers in Libraries article, “Opening the Portal to Better Relationships,” where he outlined the steps for bringing Connelly Library’s many services to La Salle University’s portal. It looks at new ways to add even greater functionality to the portal, including the use of HTML, RSS feeds, and third party software to strengthen the library’s presence in the portal. In addition to discussing the technical aspects, it explores how employing portal technology, Luminis software, has built relationships on campus and led to the nomination for the 2005 Campus Technology Innovators Award.

Coffee Break — A Chance to Visit the Exhibits
2:30 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Session C304 — Adding a Personal Touch to a Virtual World
3:15 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.


Pascal Lupien & Lorna Rourke, Academic Liaisons & Reference Librarians, University of Guelph


This session discusses how one library looks at what their users are asking about in order to be more aware of gaps in their understanding, their information needs, and their expectations for library service. Lupien and Rourke analyze hundreds of VR and e-mail reference transcripts and the questions they are being asked by students and faculty in VR to improve and enhance many aspects of library service for users. Speakers share their insights into their library needs and discuss applications being pursued, including creating knowledgebases for staff and for library users, identifying and addressing gaps in digital collections, changing the library Web site, creating new online tutorials/pathfinders/handouts, and more.
Session C305 — Virtual Reference, IM Chat, & Beyond: Taking Reference Services Out of the Library
4:15 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Diane Kresh, Library of Congress
Susan McGlamery, OCLC
Joe Thompson, Maryland Ask Us Now!
Laura Maldonado, Deborah Gaspar, & Sarah Palacios-Wilhelm, Gelman Library, George Washington University


Reference librarians use a variety of online tools in the virtual world to best serve their users and to facilitate connections to the best available librarians, whether that librarian is next door or across the world. Learn how Library of Congress has organized a Global Reference Network of reference librarians around the world that greatly expands the expertise available to the local library, including Maryland AskUSNow, which participates in both of these networks and serves the visually impaired through its participation in the InfoEyes project. Then hear the lessons learned by The Gelman Library of George Washington University, which has participated in a collaborative VR program for 5 years. Together with other member universities of the Washington Research Libraries Consortium, the library provides remote students with answers to detailed reference questions utilizing 24/7 software and IM as a collaborative tool to familiarize staff with the technology.

Jefferson Room
Track D – Digital Trends
What’s happening on the bleeding edge of the information professional world and beyond, but related to, the information world? What are some of the new trends we should be tracking? Broaden your perspective and hear some of the challenges and exciting opportunities we may face in the future.
Moderated by Julia Schult, Assistant Librarian, SUNY Cortland

Coffee Break — A Chance to Visit the Exhibits
9:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

Session D301 — Supporting the Digital World with Gadgets
10:30 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.

Hope Tillman, Director of Libraries, Babson College

Gadgets and libraries is a fun but confusing space combined with the rapid changes taking place in our digital world. Are they gadgets and or just toys? Are they useful tools for information management and knowledge sharing? Our experienced gadget gal and Internet pioneer shares what she sees happening with gadgets in the information world, some examples of gadgets at work in libraries, and some examples of new technologies yet to have library applications.

Session D302 — Catalogs/OPACs for the Future
11:30 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Roy Tennant, California Digital Library
Andrew Pace, North Carolina State University Libraries


This session takes a look at the current state of the art of integrated library systems and speculates on where OPACs are going in the future, including the speaker’s hopes and fears.

Lunch Break — A Chance to Visit the Exhibits
12:15 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.

Session D303 — The Exploding Future of Social Communication
1:45 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Brian Pomeroy, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

Many technological and social trends are converging that will transform the way we communicate and share information in the coming years. Pervasive computing, social software, “smart mobs,” citizen journalism, mobile tools, and disruptive information sources such as blogs, podcasting, and wikis are “exploding” traditional information sources such as radio, TV, newspapers ...and libraries! The result is not only new ways to access and distribute information, but a change in the very way people perceive their environment. What are these changes, when will we see them, and how exactly do they work? Who will thrive, and who will perish? What are the threats and opportunities for traditional information professionals in the coming years?

Coffee Break — A Chance to Visit the Exhibits
2:30 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
Session D304 — The Web 2.0 Challenge to Libraries
3:15 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.


Paul Miller, Technology Evangelist, Talis Information Ltd

Currently, users of Internet services such as Google, Amazon, eBay and Yahoo are enjoying fantastic, participative experiences. Unfortunately, the same can’t be said about users of traditional library and information systems. Here, the problem of silos of content held in different formats and hidden to a wider audience is preventing vendors from easily and cost-effectively building systems that can provide users with expansive and rich experiences. Project Silkworm, a collaborative project led by Talis involving partners from the public and commercial sectors, has investigated ways to make the experience of library users akin to those enjoyed by other Internet services. Hear about the key values around sharing and community and how library vendors collaborate in order to begin to deliver better services.
Session D305 — The Net of the Future: Croquet
4:15 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Marshall Breeding, Director, Innovative Technologies and Research, Vanderbilt University


Breeding reports on the Croquet project, an exciting new environment for collaboration and resource-sharing. Croquet gives us a preview of what the next generation of the Web could look like… "a combination of computer software and network architecture that supports deep collaboration and resource sharing among large numbers of users within the context of a largescale distributed information system. Along with its ability to deliver compelling 3D visualization and simulations, the Croquet system’s components are designed with a focus on enabling massively multi-user peer-to-peer collaboration and communication."

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