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Conferences > Computers in Libraries 2010
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North America’s Largest Technology Conference & Exhibition for Librarians and Information Managers
Computers in Libraries 2010
April 12 - April 14, 2010
Hyatt Regency Crystal City
2799 Jefferson Davis Highway • Arlington, VA
Computers in Libraries Celebrates 25 Years of Conferences
Final ProgramFinal Program [PDF]Conference at a Glance [PDF]
SpeakersExhibitor ListPresentations
CIL 2010 WikiCIL2010 at LibConf.comInternet@Schools
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General Conference Monday, April 12, 2010
Track A:
Information Discovery & Search
Track B:
Web Presence & Experience
Track C:
Managing 2.0
Track D:
Collaboration Strategies & Tools
Track E:
Literacies & Fluencies
OPENING KEYNOTE Information Fluency and Imagining the Internet
8:45 AM 9:45 AM
Lee Rainie, Director, Pew Research Center's Internet Project Author of the book "Networked: The New Social Operating System"

As information permeates all aspects of our lives, Rainie shares research and predictions about the impact of internet and mobile connectivity. He understands the library and information community and provides his top tips and strategies for taking advantage of the research to plan and implement key services and programs for libraries and information services.

General Conference Monday, April 12, 2010
Regency E/F, Ballroom Level

Track A Information Discovery & Search

Tools, tips and techniques for online discovery and search from industry experts and practitioners is the focus of this track. Join us for a whirlwind journey!

Moderated by Richard P. Hulser, Chief Librarian, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
COFFEE BREAK - Exhibit Hall Opens
9:45 AM 10:30 AM
A101 Super Searcher Shares: Search Tips Spectacular!
10:30 AM 11:15 AM
Mary Ellen Bates, Principal, Bates Information Services, Inc.

One of Computers in Libraries’ most popular sessions returns to turbocharge your web research. Our celebrated super searcher — and host of Searchers Academy — provides an updated-to-the-minute and jam-packed with valuable tips talk about searching the web more effectively. You don’t need to be an expert to use these techniques, but even long-time researchers will learn from them.

A102 Trends in Search & Search Engines
11:30 AM 12:15 PM
Joan Goodbody, Search Strategy Expert, ASRC Management Services at the USPTO
Laura Hjerpe, Search Strategy Expert, Stanley Associates, Inc.
Lynda L Citro, Librarian Supervisor, Englewood Charlotte Public Library, Charlotte County Library System Florida Library Association

This session looks at search engines that represent developing trends in search technology. Some problems with traditional search engines, which utilize literal or concept searching, include retrieving irrelevant results or missing relevant results. These problems may be solved by penetrating the “deep web,” much of which exists in databases requiring a query submitted by a human, or retrieving the most current web information. Our first two speakers look at and discuss search engines that attempt to solve the problems of retrieving relevant results, penetrating the deep Web, information currency, and search interfaces. They discuss representative trends — semantic search, visualization, federated search, human-powered and real-time search. Citro discusses alternate search engines using information visualization to display search results.

LUNCH BREAK - A Chance to Visit the Exhibits
12:15 PM 1:30 PM
A103 New & Hot: The Best of Resource Shelf
1:30 PM 2:30 PM
Gary Price, Co-Founder, INFODocket & FullTextReports

Keeping up with all the changes in our industry and staying one step ahead of our clients require solid strategies to deal with this challenge. Our popular expert shares his ideas, learnings, top tips, and techniques from the search and search engine world to ensure that you stay in step with the fast-changing online information world.

COFFEE BREAK - In the Exhibit Hall
2:30 PM 3:15 PM
A104 Innovative Applications of Federated Search Technology
3:15 PM 4:00 PM
Jeff Wisniewski, Web Services Librarian, University of Pittsburgh
Athena Hoeppner, Electronic Resources Librarian, University of Central Florida Libraries
Joshua Greben, Systems Librarian, Florida Center for Library Automation
Ken Varnum, Web Systems Manager, Library Information Technology, University of Michigan Library

Federated search has been around for a while. This session focuses on what’s new and innovative in the federated search landscape and takes a stab at what the future holds. Hear about the latest in the dynamic federated search marketplace and what steps you need to take for your environment. Features Federated Search Blog Contest Winner (sponsored by Deep Web Technologies).

A105 Discovery Tools: Case Study
4:15 PM 5:00 PM
Amanda J. Wilson, Director, National Transportation Library, U.S. Department of Transportation
Xin Wang, Systems Librarian, National Transportation Library, U.S. Department of Transportation

A one-stop portal is the ideal way to facilitate information discovery and decision-making, but no one tool suffices. The next generation of information access — beyond federated searching — is discovery. Illustrating with a case study, this session looks at the challenges and solutions of implementation of a discovery tool, customer feedback and improvements, and maintenance, as well as lessons learned and next steps.

RECEPTION IN THE EXHIBIT HALL
5:00 PM 5:45 PM
General Conference Monday, April 12, 2010
Regency A/B/C/D, Ballroom Level

Track B Web Presence & Experience

Developing the library’s web presence strategy means keeping an eye on the data — research, analytics and competitive data — as well as keeping users front and center. Web presence is greater than the library website, and user experience plays an important role in opinions about the library. Get tips, ideas, and insights from our speakers, who present real case studies and lessons learned.

Moderated by Darlene Fichter, GovInfo Librarian, University of Saskatchewan Library
COFFEE BREAK - Exhibit Hall Opens
9:45 AM 10:30 AM
B101 Experience Design Makeover
10:30 AM 11:15 AM
David Lee King, Digital Services Director, Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library and Publisher, davidleeking.com

Have customers said your website is confusing? Does your website desperately need an experience design makeover? This session guides you  through a real-life library website extreme makeover, focusing on experience design elements used. It provides five ways to jump-start your own experience design makeovers and leaves you with solid ideas to use on your own website!

B102 Improving Visual Web Experience
11:30 AM 12:15 PM
Len Davidson, Systems Librarian, Catholic University
Michael Beccaria, Systems Librarian/Head of Digital Initiatives, Paul Smith's College
Heather Harrison, Public Services Librarian, Paul Smith's College

Davidson discusses neat, free mapping tools from Google and Bing: Google Earth to create narrations and movies of 3-D map views of any street or city on the globe; Google Fusion to quickly map data in table form; Bing Maps, with a free geocoding function so you can easily map lists of addresses and collaborate with groups of people; Bing Photosynth to create 3-D photo images and embed them into maps. He illustrates how students and faculty use these tools, and highlights the library’s use of the tools on its website. The second presentation discusses how recent software developments released by Microsoft Labs have opened up opportunities for libraries to present their collections and displays in a whole new way. Microsoft Deepzoom and Photosynth are free, easy-to-use tools that can be used to display large collections of images, to zoom in and out seamlessly to any page of an entire scanned book, display a 3-D rendering of your programs to the public with ease, or offer a quick and flashy online version of your library displays or artwork that is fun to use. See creative ways to use it in libraries.

LUNCH BREAK - A Chance to Visit the Exhibits
12:15 PM 1:30 PM
B103 Website Redesign: Two Case Studies
1:30 PM 2:30 PM
Sarah Houghton, Director, San Rafael Public Library
Kristina Bobe, Outreach Librarian, Library Services & Content Management, U.S. Government Printing Office ALA GODORT Division
Stephen Fernie, Multimedia Specialist, Lauinger Library, Georgetown University
Shian Chang, Senior Programmer Analyst, Library Information Technology, Lauinger Library, Georgetown University
William Wheeler, Department Head, Research and Instruction, Lauinger Library, Georgetown University

Library website redesigns rarely go the way we want them to. They take more time, money, and effort than we would like. This session features two case studies from experienced practitioners highlighting lessons learned and useful tips. Houghton-Jan focuses on successful best practices, quick and cheap ways to handle project planning, project management, staff and customer involvement, communication, usability, and new website launch techniques as well as coping techniques for dealing with setbacks and keeping staff energy and excitement up throughout the process. The second case study discusses redesigning a website from the ground up, completely revising the site and rethinking the process to incorporate user-centered design as well as highlight library resources. It talks about utilizing Web 2.0 and open-source materials such as LibData for subject guides, a wiki for project organization, transparency and communication, and Drupal for content management.

COFFEE BREAK - In the Exhibit Hall
2:30 PM 3:15 PM
B104 Analyzing, Evaluating, & Communicating the Value of Web Presence
3:15 PM 4:00 PM
Michael Porter, President, Library Renewal libraryman.com
Amanda Clay Powers, Reference Librarian, Mitchell Memorial Library, Mississippi State University

Thanks to powerful new web tools such as Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Flickr, and YouTube, we have been able to build community and promote resources and services in revolutionary ways. And while we know that our institutions have become more relevant and effective using them, how do we prove it to administrators, coworkers, and community members? How do we find the data to demonstrate the value of these highly practical and innovative tools? And then how do we translate those numbers for the people that fund our programs? Speakers share their methodologies, results, challenges, and stories in working to demonstrate the value of these emerging technologies in marketing and creating community. Audience participation and contribution is highly encouraged, so bring your methods, stories, and challenges too!

B105 Well-Organized Sites & Portals
4:15 PM 5:00 PM
Mr. Chris Jasek, UCD Portfolio Manager, Elsevier
Emily R Shem-Tov, Research Portal Program Manager, Global Market Research & Planning, Adobe Systems

Jasek offers best practices on how libraries can organize all of the features that their websites offer. He shares a five-step process that explains how to get from understanding users and the main tasks they come to accomplish to making the right choices on links or features to present. He recommends broad categories for organization of tasks/content to help web browsers find exactly what they need by improving the overall organization of features offered. Shem-Tov presents a case study of how a team of special librarians collaborates to provide services through a taxonomy- and search-driven research portal, physical and online libraries, information skills training programs, and a variety of social media tools. Find out how they continue to push the limits of what they can do by incorporating new technologies and tactics to better serve their customers and raise awareness of their offerings and of better information skills in general, and how they tie in the different elements through coordinated campaigns.

RECEPTION IN THE EXHIBIT HALL
5:00 PM 5:45 PM
General Conference Monday, April 12, 2010
Washington, Ballroom Level

Track C Managing 2.0

Managing projects, strategies, and people in a fast-changing digital world has many challenges. Our experienced practitioners share their insights and techniques and create great discussions on managing in the current information environment.

Moderated by Rebecca Jones, Partner, Dysart & Jones Associates
COFFEE BREAK - Exhibit Hall Opens
9:45 AM 10:30 AM
C101 Tips for Fast Tech Project Implementation
10:30 AM 11:15 AM
John Blyberg, Assistant Director for Innovation and User Experience, Darien Library
Amanda Etches, Head, Discovery & Access, University of Guelph
Sarah Houghton, Director, San Rafael Public Library

Come and hear seasoned technology managers talk about library-tested “Black Ops Ninja-style” ways to ensure that your technology project gets full consideration and approval. Library users want technology and library staff members want to implement technology. But we all know that sometimes there are barriers to efficient technology project implementation that can frustrate and dishearten staff. No matter what aspect of library technology you work in, this session will help you get your projects done faster and done right. Make sure that your projects never again get bogged down in procedure and committee. Viva la resistance!

C102 Achieving Org 2.0
11:30 AM 12:15 PM
Meredith Farkas, Head of Instructional Initiatives, Kreitzberg Library, Norwich University Lecturer, San Jose State University

There has been a lot of buzz about Web 2.0 over the past few years, and many libraries have devoted significant staff time toward implementing 2.0 technologies. One look at the number of abandoned library blogs, wikis and MySpace profiles tells us that successful implementation of Web 2.0 technologies requires more than simply installing software. Most libraries are not currently structured to successfully embrace Web 2.0, which requires rapid user-centered change, experimentation, and radical trust. Farkas discusses why so many 2.0 initiatives fail and what organizations need to do to position themselves to take advantage of the 2.0 technologies in ways that will ensure successful implementation. She includes practical tips, illustrated with examples from libraries that are already on the road to 2.0 through their innovative practices and services.

LUNCH BREAK - A Chance to Visit the Exhibits
12:15 PM 1:30 PM
C103 Decision Making & Decisions in a Digital Age
1:30 PM 2:30 PM
Brent Mast, Information Research Specialist, Congressional Research Service, Library Of Congress
Adrienne Canty, Manager, Research and Assessment, Edmonton Public Library

This session looks at examples of how the digital age is affecting strategic decision making and risk management in libraries. Mast examines some helpful and not-so-helpful developments for librarians using information to make decisions about collecting, cataloging, and facilitating access to collections of information and discusses the merits of popular techniques and tools for improving decision making and decisions. Using an RFID project as a case study, Canty presents EPL’s formalized decision-making model, which brings multiple factors together to help determine optimal conditions and locations for automated sorter installation.

COFFEE BREAK - In the Exhibit Hall
2:30 PM 3:15 PM
C104 Gen X Librarians: Leading From the Middle
3:15 PM 4:00 PM
Lisa Carlucci Thomas, Digital Services Librarian, Southern Connecticut State University
Karen Sobel, Reference & Instruction Librarian, University of Colorado Denver
Nina McHale, Web Developer, Digital Services, Arapahoe Library District

Generation X librarians bridge the varied, and often conflicting, attitudes, ideals, and expectations of the multi-generational library. Leading fearlessly from the middle, Gen X librarians are paving the way for the modern library to emerge, by championing innovation, mediating change, and translating cultural norms between generations within the workplace. Librarians from two universities identify best practices of Gen X library leaders, describe the unique skills and strengths of Gen X librarians, and offer their predictions on the professional legacy of this influential generation.

C105 Digital Managers Sound Off
4:15 PM 5:00 PM
Bobbi L. Newman, Consultant, writer, Librarian by Day
David Lee King, Digital Services Director, Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library and Publisher, davidleeking.com
Sarah Houghton, Director, San Rafael Public Library

Have you seen jobs listed lately? Digital initiatives librarian. Digital branch manager. Digital strategies manager. Ever wondered what these people do at a library and why they’re needed? This session introduces you to a digital strategies manager’s job and a digital branch. Panelists discuss their unique roles in their libraries, what their day-to-day jobs look like, and the unique challenges they encounter along the way. And more importantly, they provide tips on how you can use this new role in your library and in your current job.

RECEPTION IN THE EXHIBIT HALL
5:00 PM 5:45 PM
General Conference Monday, April 12, 2010
President's Quarters, 3rd Floor

Track D Collaboration Strategies & Tools

Working together with teams around the world, across the street or down the hall requires appropriate tools and practices. This track provides real live examples, case studies, and lots of tools to help you create successful collaborative initiatives in your environment. It also provides lots of opportunities for participation in the discussion of collaboration strategies and tools.

Moderated by David Stern, Associate Dean for Public Services, Illinois State University
COFFEE BREAK - Exhibit Hall Opens
9:45 AM 10:30 AM
D101 Digital Commons: Building Digital Communities Using Digital Collections
10:30 AM 11:15 AM
Jim DelRosso, Digital Projects Coordinator, Hospitality, Labor, and Management Library, Cornell University

Librarians can build online communities around their digital collections in the same way they build physical communities around their physical collections: by providing resources that interest their patrons, by making their patrons feel comfortable using those resources, and by providing their patrons with a sense of ownership of those resources. Hear how one library used the tools provided by new technologies to build a community of users around DigitalCommons@ILR, a premier institutional and disciplinary repository. They share their strategies, practices, experiences and lessons learned, and illustrate how their success keeps them coming back.

D102 Real-Time Collaboration Tools
11:30 AM 12:15 PM
Karen Huffman, Manager, Technology Solutions, Information Systems & Technology, National Geographic Society Special Libraries Association

This session looks at the landscape of web tools that enable people to come together with audio, video, documents and surveys, calendaring, and wikibased sites. It includes such tools as Google Apps (e.g., calendaring, docs, videos, sites, and templates), Google Groups, Skype, and more. Learn how you can enrich your communication and interaction with exciting, inexpensive or free, tools.

LUNCH BREAK - A Chance to Visit the Exhibits
12:15 PM 1:30 PM
D103 What Administrators Need to Know About Technology
1:30 PM 2:30 PM
Roy Tennant, Senior Program Officer, Research, OCLC Online Computer Library Center, Inc.

A very different set of skills are needed to run an organization, and those skills do not often come packaged along with technical knowledge and experience. But administrators need to know some specific things about technology in order to do their jobs well. Hear about the top 10 things administrators need to know and see if you agree!

COFFEE BREAK - In the Exhibit Hall
2:30 PM 3:15 PM
D104 Google Wave
3:15 PM 4:00 PM
Moderator: Rebecca Jones, Partner, Dysart & Jones Associates
Bob Keith, Technologist, New Jersey State Library

This session is for those who are piloting or want to pilot Google’s Wave, or those who want to hear what the library community is doing with the Wave. Join this facilitated discussion of current practices and applications. Share your learnings, challenges and successes. If you haven’t played with this new real time collaboration tool, check it out at http://wave.google. com/help/wave/about.html.

D105 Twitter Tools: Applications & Success Stories
4:15 PM 5:00 PM
Moderator: Michael P Sauers, Technology Innovation Librarian, Technology & Access Services, Nebraska Library Commission

Join this interactive discussion of Twitter tools — from managing Twitter feeds to searching them to capturing and analyzing them. Hear how libraries and information professionals have successfully applied these tools in different environments.

RECEPTION IN THE EXHIBIT HALL
5:00 PM 5:45 PM
General Conference Monday, April 12, 2010
Potomac, Ballroom Level

Track E Literacies & Fluencies

Literacy has been defined as the ability to read, write, and comprehend. This literacy isn’t enough for today and certainly won’t be enough in the future. Information, computer and subject-specific literacies are critical. This track looks at how libraries are actively helping users build literacies and fluencies (the convergence of literacies plus critical thinking). Critical is right!

Moderated by Richard Geiger, Information & News Consultant
COFFEE BREAK - Exhibit Hall Opens
9:45 AM 10:30 AM
E101 Information Fluency Strategies & Practices
10:30 AM 11:15 AM
Chad Mairn, Information Services Librarian, St. Petersburg College

Information fluency is the intersection of information literacy, computer literacy and critical thinking and is a “must” for participants of the 21st century. Mairn explores a variety of resources, research tools, and tips that can be integrated into course management systems and/or traditional classroom settings to help build fluency and develop critical thinking. These tools range from using real-time web/mobile services like Twitter to using conventional econtent more creatively and other tools/services to construct a learning environment — online or face-to-face — that is conducive to information discovery, sharing, and lifelong learning.

E102 Libraries & Transliteracy
11:30 AM 12:15 PM
Bobbi L. Newman, Consultant, writer, Librarian by Day
Matthew Hamilton, IT Manager, Denver Public Library

People need to be literate to be involved in and contribute to society. Times are changing, technologies are evolving rapidly, and it’s no longer enough to focus on the ability to read and write alone. Libraries need to shift their focus to transliteracy, the ability to read, write, and interact across a range of platforms, tools, and media, from signing and orality through handwriting, print, TV, radio, and film, to digital social networks. Come learn how transliteracy is tied to literacy and why it is important to libraries.

LUNCH BREAK - A Chance to Visit the Exhibits
12:15 PM 1:30 PM
E103 Developing Specific Fluencies: Case Studies
1:30 PM 2:30 PM
Jan Johansson, Data Librarian, Congressional Research Service, Library Of Congress
Paul Schirle, GIS Analyst, Congressional Research Service, Library Of Congress GISP
Eleonora Dubicki, Associate Librarian, Monmouth University Library

This session begins by examining how CRS learned about GIS, designed a new function and roles to the library, and designed training to promote fluency in spatial thinking for public policy analysis. The speakers reveal lessons learned from this successful implementation, both from the perspective of the library and from the perspective of the GIS specialist, including using task-based training to show immediate value to end users, leveraging early successes to improve credibility, and techniques for sustaining attention to a complicated new topic. Dubicki explains how a study of Monmouth’s business students showed that the majority begin their research with internet sources rather than subscription e-resources with authoritative  information. She discusses strategies for improving the students’ information literacy and how the library assists students in developing skills in evaluating websites and the library’s databases, and making information fluency a more relevant and lifelong skill.

COFFEE BREAK - In the Exhibit Hall
2:30 PM 3:15 PM
E104 Information Literacy: Life Cycle & Economic Benefits
3:15 PM 4:00 PM
Ms. Barbie E. Keiser, President, Barbie E. Keiser, Inc.
Derik A Badman, Development and Support, Springshare, Inc.
Nathan Flinchum, Community Technology Center Librarian, Public Services, Roanoke Public Libraries

The effects of an information-illiterate population can be felt throughout an economy, and within individual enterprises, through the loss of productivity by workers searching for information, not to mention the loss of opportunity to the firm if vital pieces of information are overlooked entirely. Keiser measures indicators of economic vibrancy in relation to indicators of information literacy and suggests ways in which governments, academic institutions, industry associations, database producers, vendors, aggregators, websites, and libraries contribute to the economic prosperity of nations, industries, companies, and individuals through information literacy programs. Badman and Flinchum identify the changing information needs, along with the literacies needed to fill those needs, over the course of a patron’s lifespan in the context of the institutions suited to meet these needs. They discuss the points in which public, academic, and school libraries can work together to make transitions between institutions easier and reduce the obstacles to information literacy that may exist at any point in time.

E105 LibGuides: Web Tools to Enhance Information Fluency?
4:15 PM 5:00 PM
Diane L. Schrecker, Curriculum Librarian, Ashland University Library
Kristina DeVoe, English & Communications Librarian, Temple University
Derik A Badman, Development and Support, Springshare, Inc.

LibGuides, a Web 2.0 content management and information sharing system, is designed specifically for libraries to incorporate multimedia and Web 2.0 elements in subject research guides, course projects, and an increasing number of nontraditional collaborative projects. Schrecker outlines the many facets of a new doctoral research guide, faculty orientation session, and collaborative faculty technology presentation using LibGuides to create fluent information portals. DeVoe and Badman discuss a study with approximately 20 sections of a research-based public speaking course where students from half of the sections were exposed to a course-specific LibGuide embedded within Blackboard while the students from the other half were not. They share the findings from students’ annotated bibliographies and questionnaire feedback to determine if access to LibGuides encourages students to utilize higher-quality information resources and, subsequently, impacts student academic success.

RECEPTION IN THE EXHIBIT HALL
5:00 PM 5:45 PM
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